When I first heard that Linkin Park was coming to South Africa, I was really, really, really excited. Then I stopped for a moment and wondered if anyone I knew would actually be interested in going to a Linkin Park concert. A couple of friends of mine are really into the metal scene, so they wouldn’t be caught dead there. I knew a few of my other friends are really into the local music scene. Others habitually ragged me for liking Linkin Park, which got so bad I just pretended not to listen to Linkin Park when I was with them (I’ve learnt since then not to care so much about what other people think, even if they are my friends).

I have good and bad days, just like everyone else, but on particularly bad days, nothing speaks to me quite like the music from Hybrid Theory and Meteora. Heck, even on normal days, these two Linkin Park albums still appeal to the cynical and jaded side of myself. I’m less of a fan of their new sound that they debuted in Minutes to Midnight, but I still liked it enough that I listen to it from time to time.

So on one hand, Linkin Park coming to South Africa is a once in a lifetime event, on the other, going alone to a major concert was less than ideal (although strangely suitable considering the themes of their first two albums).

I decided to post on Facebook and find out if at least one of my 300 odd friends and acquaintances was interested in going. As it turns out, quite a lot of them were, and they had already booked tickets. Despite feeling pressured into hiding my love for Linkin Park in the past, I now saw that many people I know shared my love for Linkin Park’s earlier work. Even though it would have been apt for me to go solo , I could rest assured that I wouldn’t have to go alone. I logged onto Computicket, and one weekends spending money later, I had a ticket to Linkin Park.

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