Django Unchained Poster

If there’s one thing Quentin Tarantino knows how to make, it’s man-porn, and by that I mean Tarantino knows how to make movies that appeal to guys (he hasn’t made actual porn – as far as I know).

The story in Django Unchained is pretty simple. Django is en-route to his new owners when a bounty hunter by the name of Dr. King Schultz decides to purchase him. This bounty hunter has a hard time convincing the slavers to part with Django, so they need some motivation. After convincing one slaver, by killing the other, Schultz tells Django about his quest. Schultz is on the hunt for a gang but he doesn’t know what they look like. Django however does, so Schultz agrees to give Django his freedom in exchange for his help with tracking down and killing the gang. Django agrees, and as Schultz and him become friends, Schultz discovers that Django has a wife that he hopes to find. Schultz agrees to help Django once they have turned in this bounty.

Being a Tarantino movie, one has to look at what Tarantino does oh so very well: style. This movie oozes character and atmosphere, without ever going so over the top that it borders on absurdity. This is not to say this movie isn’t over the top (it is), but rather that it never makes you think “Well that’s just ridiculous!” It really pushes things quite far without pulling you out of the movie, which is something that is quite tricky to do.

Adding to the style are both the characters and the music.

Tarantino keeps his characters pretty straight forward In Django Unchained. The good guys are good and the bad guys are so very, very bad. Well, not exactly. Some of the actions taken by the good guys could seem questionable, if not for the fact that these actions are performed on some of the most evil people I’ve seen in a movie for a very long time. Without a doubt my favourite character in the movie is Dr. Schultz, who proves to be a man of incredible moral fibre who won’t bend his beliefs for anyone. Christoph Waltz does an amazing job bringing Dr. Schultz to life! Jamie Foxx plays the born gunslinger Django, and his performance is also very good, if not quite as good as Christoph’s. The only problem I had initially was with Samuel L. Jackson. Even when he’s an old decrepit house servant, he’s still playing the foul-mouthed Samuel L. Jackson. However, I can’t deny that it works, and if the guys who make the Boondocks animated show ever need an actor to play the angry potty-mouthed Stinkmeiner, Sam J. would be perfect.

Badass sunglasses? Check.
Badass sunglasses? Check.

The music is also very good. The tracks that stood out for me were the songs that had that classic Western, some might even say B movie, feel. A few of the other tracks that just screamed “total bad ass” were the hip-hop tracks that accompanied the action scenes. These tracks got your blood pumping as the bullets whizzed by!

And the action? It’s Tarantino. I swear he must own shares in a company that makes fake blood, because there’s plenty of it in Django Unchained. When someone gets shot, you know they got shot. There’s also quite a few scenes with some violence that isn’t really gory, but that may disturb sensitive viewers. There isn’t necessarily a lot of blood in them but they are quite intense to say the least. So if you’re squeamish, you may want to give this movie a skip.

The cinematography is what you’d expect it to be, but I like the little nods to martial arts cinematography (such as the crash zooms) that pop up in the movie.

Movie Rating: With it’s intense action, and strong leads who exude attitude, there’s no doubt that Django will appeal to most men (if not, you may want to get your testosterone levels checked). The story is fairly simple, but there’s a fair amount of humor to keep you entertained inbetween the action. This movie has me wishing that Tarantino would make a Dragonball Z movie. He understands what makes men tick and what appeals to them, and no doubt his take on DBZ would be awesome. But until then, we’ll have to live with our bad-ass, no-nonsense cowboys.

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